Archives for Green Home

clean-energy-house_Small

 

If you are renovating, you should consider the green strategies suggested in this realestate.com post by Danielle King.  For example, add insulation to the roof and external walls and you could save 25% on energy costs.  Replace inefficient windows or add window film since up to 40% of your heating can be lost through windows in winter.

 

Energy efficient appliances, LED lighting and solar panels will also contribute savings, while protecting the environment. Implement water collection techniques to use rainwater for toilets and the garden.  Include water efficient faucets and showerheads. Add high-flow taps that make baths and washing machines fill quickly. Use low/no Voltatile Organic Compound (VOC) materials where possible, and non-toxic paints.to read more click here.

The post 5 tips for eco-friendly renovations appeared first on Team Realty.

Source: Blog

The increase in electricity tariffs. Concept

 

Because the cost of electricity is expected to rise as a result of the federal Liberals’ green energy policies, prudent investors should pay attention to the energy consumption of their rental properties. This Canadian Real Estate Magazine post advises landlords to find ways to become more energy efficient such as installing programmable thermostats and motion sensor lights. More important is to pass the higher cost of hydro on to their tenants, whenever possible, and to implement an energy consumption ceiling for their all-inclusive leases.  To read more click here.

Source: Blog

How Google Sunroof Works

Employing the high-resolution aerial mapping used by Google Earth, Project Sunroof calculates the amount of sunlight reaching your roof to assess its potential for solar power.  It takes a variety of factors into account including local weather conditions, shade from nearby trees and buildings and sun positions throughout the year.  The tool combines this information with data from your household’s monthly electricity bill, factors in panel orientation and tilt to the roof surface to calculate average monthly and annual solar radiation, recommends the size of solar installation needed and estimates the cost to purchase or lease the hardware as well as the amount that could be saved with solar panels.

The tool is only available in the San Francisco Bay Area, Fresno and Boston, however, should Google decide to expand that coverage, they have ample capital reserves to act quickly.  They might offer serious competition to the Australian Photovoltaic Institute’s Live Solar Potential Tool, which currently provides similar services.

How Google Sunroof is Changing Homeowners’ Costs

Photovoltaic (PV) solar panels harness the power of the sun by allowing photons, or particles of light, to knock electrons free from atoms, generating a flow of electricity.  The electric current can power your home’s appliances or be put back into the grid.  Google Sunroof has developed a tool to help homeowners assess the solar power potential of their roof.

Improvements to Photovoltaic Technology

In the 1980′s photovoltaics consumed more energy than they produced over their lifetime.  Now the energy return ratio (ERR) on solar panels has improved exponentially. According to Professional Engineering magazine, the energy payback times (EPBT), the time it takes to produce all the energy used in their lifespan, is currently are between 6 months and 2 years.  And, with life cycles of 30 years, their ERR is 60:1 and 15:1.  In other words, solar panels produce 15 – 60 times the energy required to make them.

Advantages of Net Metering

Since their energy source is the sun, solar panels produce “clean” electricity, without emitting carbon.  And, many locations, including Ontario, offer “Net Metering” which means the utility credits a homeowner for solar energy that is not consumed by the home.  You send the excess electricity you generate to the local distribution system for a credit toward future energy costs. In essence, it’s a “trade” of electricity you supply against electricity you consume.

Source: Blog